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Data Centers Moving to “Sweat” Shops

December, 2014

What is really happening in the greening of the data center? We are not seeing orders of magnitude reduction of power consumption. We are not seeing the use of cleaner power plants. Evidently, engineers and other individuals working at Data Centers (DCs) will be increasingly making wardrobe changes from light jackets and slacks to shorts and sleeveless shirts. The expectation is that the standard operating mode for many DCs will be as high as 90 degrees Fahrenheit. At least one major components vendor is working on chip sets, which will work more effectively under such conditions and actually, the permitted temperature for a server can normally reach 90°F (although it is usually advocated not to go beyond 77°F). Obviously, in moving in this direction, the cost of cooling a DC can come down substantially. However, what is not as recognizable is the extremely high cost of having all of...

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Another Savior of Data Center MM Fiber?

January, 2015

In addition to the development of longer-distance and higher-speed VCSELs, there is a possibility that in the long term, polymer waveguide material embedded in electronics could also help to extend the life of multimode fiber in data centers. Yet right now, the technology appears to be reminiscent of the use of silicon photonics with active components, but without the hype. As with SI photonics, the concept of these types of waveguides has been discussed for many years with the problem of loss being a major concern, and right now, the vast majority of dialog on the latter can be found almost exclusively in engineering papers and patent applications. An exception has been Dow Corning, which has for a while been making somewhat of a marketing push, such as at trade shows with its short-reach interconnects utilizing “low loss,” silicone-based polymer waveguides. Back in early 2013,...

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Cyberattacks: Lower Bandwidth Growth Rates?

January, 2015

Going back to 9/11, there began the realization that an attack on data center infrastructure would make a large corporation the most vulnerable – even more than the loss of the leadership. Simply put, it could stop business in the water. It seems that one of the biggest areas of potential exposure to cyberattacks is in the handoff to outside networks, and if there is a substantial shift in enterprises minimizing these interfaces, it would obviously decrease the amount of bandwidth needed for transport by public networks. We know of one Fortune 250 corporation, which has had at least two encounters with cyber hackers in China over the last two years regarding stolen intellectual property. One of the attacks involved Windows 2000 (Microsoft retired and stopped supporting those servers), and so the engineering team moved horizontally across the company to take control of those relevant...

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Surviving in a 10G World

February, 2015

Given that the lion’s share of the discussion in telecom forums is about vaporware, it is not surprising that a lot people in the industry would probably be amazed to hear that R&D spending on 10G devices is still happening. While the really compelling drama within suppliers is occurring with mature or even declining market situations, including on 1G and on VCSELs, in which substantial revenue is on the line, the obsession on analyzing the accounts of the various futuristic, sexier solutions can sound repetitive, and at the end of the day, they have a tendency to be quite boring. In contrast, the struggle for 10G transport equipment vendors to survive is a captivating narrative involving a data rate, which will remain a mainstay in public and enterprise networks for a very long time -- in which there is still an overabundance of participants (partially because financing going back to...

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Bullish on 850nm VCSELs; Avago Selling VCSEL Components

March, 2015

As we will demonstrate on an OFC 2015 panel, the data center VCSEL market will remain healthy for an extremely long time, especially in terms of steady revenues. The most shocking change is based on recent evidence that Avago Technologies is selling VCSEL components, possibly including as far down the food chain as bare die, to at least one interconnect solutions provider and at the request of a minimum of one very large enterprise. In even reading between the lines of a small portion of the transcript of the latest quarterly report from the vendor, it indicates a move in this direction: "...[W]hen you start talking about 25[G], you’re talking about having to drive short-reach or even longer reach native 25, which makes it very tough to produce laser, VCSELs, laser, so to speak, that does 25 gigabit. We are one of the few guys who can do it. And we happily sold it to guys who do 100...

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